18Feb

Fight Club Decision-Making

 

There’s this great scene in the movie Fight Club where the unnamed Narrator/protagonist (played by Edward Norton) meets Tyler Durden (played by Brad Pitt).

Durden is opposed to the typical airline chit-chat the Narrator is offering until Norton’s character cracks a joke about Durden being the most interesting “single serving friend I’ve ever meet…you know, cause everything on a plane is single-serving.”

Durden responds simply, “No I get it. It’s clever…How’s that working out for you? Being clever. Good? Well keep it up!

“How’s that working for you?”

That question is brilliant…and it’s one of two questions you should ask yourself before making any decision.

1.) How will this work for me?

How will it affect me and my life? How will this change my present-day circumstances as well as my future possibilities in life? Far too often people end up making decisions they quickly regret simply because they acted rashly instead of slowing down and thinking through how this decision will actually affect them.

Yet another question is necessary in wise decision-making. Scripture commands us in Philippians 2:4,

Let each of you look not only to his own interests, but also to the interests of others.

2.) How will this work for others?

It’s important to think about how this decision will potentially impact those around you, specifically the following two groups of people:

  • Loved ones – family and friends that you deeply care about. These are the people we have the highest potential to help or harm with our decisions.
  • Those who don’t know Jesus – Cards on the table…this assumes you’re a follower of Jesus. If you’re not, you already know the following to be true. An unbelieving world needs to see Christians become wise decision-makers. The world needs to see Christians live their lives fully aware of how it affects those around them, not just their immediate circle of loved ones but all people they encounter, especially those who are not believers.

You can also use these questions to evaluate a past decision’s present effectiveness to determine if a new course is needed or if you simply need to plow ahead.

Imagine what the Church could accomplish all over the world if all Christians would ask these two questions before, or while, making a decision…no matter how big or small!

 

 

 

 

Share this Story

About Steven Hill

Leave a Reply

© Copyright 2013, All Rights Reserved